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The Canadian spaceport launch vehicle year end rankings

MLS launch from the Nova Scotia spaceport. Credit: MLS.

As 2020 comes to an end and we publish our 3rd edition of the Canadian Spaceport Launch Vehicle Power Rankings, we ask ourselves is the glass half empty or half full? That perception is up to you. Event though it's been a very difficult year with the COVID-19 pandemic sweeping across the globe, there are signs for optimism.

It's also a time for the government to step up and support a Canadian spaceport. Standing on the sidelines won't do anymore, the government needs to keep moving forward with implementing its space strategy, and that includes supporting a Canadian spaceport. We discuss how this can be achieved in a cost-effective way.

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About Marc Boucher

Marc Boucher
Boucher is an entrepreneur, writer, editor & publisher. He is the founder of SpaceQ Media Inc. and CEO and co-founder of SpaceRef Interactive Inc. Boucher has 20 years working in various roles in the space industry and a total of 28 years as a technology entrepreneur including creating Maple Square, Canada's first internet directory and search engine.

2 comments

  1. Avatar

    Canada is too far away from the equator to have a viable space port. The closer to the equator the less energy required, and hence cheaper, to put a satellite into orbit if I remember correctly.

  2. Marc Boucher

    Canada is not too far north. In fact, the well used Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan is slightly farther north than the proposed MLS Nova Scotia spaceport. And all the Russian cosmodromes are further north.