The Surprise of Comet NEOWISE

Comet NEOWISE (C/2020 F3 ) in the pre-dawn skies on July 9 over Deer Valley, Utah. Credit: NASA/Bill Dunford.

Comet NEOWISE took astronomers somewhat by surprise. You see, comets can be very finicky with respect to how bright they get. And because the comet became bright enough for the public to see, well, it’s a rare treat. 

In this special episode of the SpaceQ Podcast we’re learning about Comet NEOWISE including when and how the public can enjoy seeing the comet for themselves.

Comet NEOWISE was discovered earlier this year on March 27. Yesterday, NASA held two events to discuss the comet. The first was geared towards a general audience and was hosted by the NASA Science Live team. So the first part of the podcast, a little over 6 minutes, is going to provide you with the basic background and information you need to enjoy viewing the comet. Unfortunately, the comet is only visible to those in the northern hemisphere.

The second part of the podcast is a media teleconference where the media get to ask the experts their questions. You would be surprised at some of the questions and answers. The NASA experts included Lindley Johnson, planetary defense officer and program executive of NASA’s Planetary Defense Coordination Office, NASA Headquarters, Emily Kramer, co-investigator on the Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) science team, NASA JPL and Amy Mainzer, NEOWISE principal investigator, University of Arizona.

Listen in.

The Show

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About Marc Boucher

Marc Boucher
Boucher is an entrepreneur, writer, editor & publisher. He is the founder of SpaceQ Media Inc. and CEO and co-founder of SpaceRef Interactive Inc. Boucher has 20 years working in various roles in the space industry and a total of 28 years as a technology entrepreneur including creating Maple Square, Canada's first internet directory and search engine.

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