Tag Archives: Alouette 1

All Talk – No Action: Making the Case for Space in Canada

Alouette 1 ready to ship for launch

Ironically, on the eve of its anniversary this week, hearing that Canada was the third nation in space again causes me to want eat my own liver – not because the feat is not notable or something not to be proud of, but because often it is brought forward under the wrong context. We should not be asking “why Canada cannot keep doing these great …

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50 Years of Space Serving Canadians

At the 2012 Canadian Space Summit held last week at the University of Western Ontario in London this keynote highlighted Canada’s 50 years in space. Perry Edmundson of COM DEV International with help from Dr. David Kendall of the Canadian Space Agency and Dr. Lucy Stojak of HEC Montreal put together this excellent presentation.

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Alouette 1 – Celebrating 50 Years of Canada in Space

Sam Ayre and Harry Kowalik working on the Alouette 1 mockup spacecraft.

Canada’s first satellite, Alouette 1, is best known for being dedicated to scientific research. But that is only part of the story. Alouette 1, which continues to silently orbit the Earth on the 50th anniversary of its launch, was as much a product of the Cold War as its more famous predecessor, Sputnik, and it was a forerunner of the communications satellites that have since …

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Alouette-1 Launched Canada as a Space Nation

Atop a Thor-Agena B rocket, Alouette-1 launched from Vandenberg, California, on September 29, 1962 at 6:05 UTC. This launch made Canada the third nation in space with its own satellite in orbit, following closely on the exploits of the Soviet Union and the United States. “Just as the railroad linking the country from coast to coast has played a key role in Canada’s history, the …

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